Hiroshima photos…a lost past

An excellent link to the webzine Design Observer, and a riveting article about some photos recently found, documenting the devastation and destruction of bombs dropped over 60 years ago.
I require that you post a response, and I suspect many of you might want to, especially in light of an article reported on CNN.com today, saying a WMD attack in the world is within five years of our reality. Chilling thoughts, riveting glimpses into the past and grave questions about what people like you and me, the designers and shapers and modelers of our future, will do to prevent such dire consequences for our futures….can we, indeed, make a difference?

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Comments

  • chriswren  On December 11, 2008 at 1:38 am

    Absolutely riveting. Looking at the level of destruction… I am somewhat speachless. Not only because of the images in the photos, but also because of what’s missing. Life. I think the coffin-like box that held the photos is perfectly symbolic. The only thing is, they can’t make it big enough to hold all of the death and destruction the images relate.

    Not too long ago, it wasn’t uncommon to here somebody jokenly say “Nuke-em.” The reality is that now that statement is in the hearts of some very evil men with full intention on carrying it out. As designers, I think we can have a profound impact on society by bringing the dark consequences of some actions to light; hopefully, preventing similar atrocities around the world. At the least, show why dipolmacy should be pursued as long as it possibly long can.

    Also, through art and design, we have the opportunity to put faces with labels, with countries, and with people. We can bring the relationship down to a personal level and reduce the fear associated with the unknown for some people. We have the chance to show the good and the responsibility to show the bad, all around the world. Since disign is so “hands-on,” each and every one of us has the potential to make a difference.

  • kaitlinpb  On December 8, 2008 at 9:36 pm

    I think that was the most poignant point of it all really. There was no warning. You look at these pictures, paper renderings of world obliterated and no longer existent. It’s like seeing a physical interpretation of nothingness.

    I think as designers, as artists, we’re required to depict the truth in any way we can. Hiroshima was a tragedy and the photographer definitely showed that. As an artist, he is doing what he can to prevent another warningless disaster.

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